Saturday, January 30, 2010

Kenan House


Here's a house that still bears scars of a fire when Wilson's Raiders plundered Selma during one of the last battles of the Civil War in April 1865.

Located just north of town, the Kenan House was in the direct path of the Union calvary headed to destroy the Selma Arsenal and Naval Gunworks.

Finding no one home, the Yankees piled furniture in the parlor and set it afire. But this 1826 Greek Revival that was built from lumber on the property, didn't burn, thanks to servants who rushed out of hiding as soon as the troops were gone. However, a large area of the charred floor is still visible in front of the parlor fireplace.

The Kenan House is among nine homes that will be open for visitors during the Historic Selma Pilgrimage March 18-21. The nearby Kenan's Mill, an 1860's gristmill on Valley Creek, will also be open, and visitors can purchase stone-ground cornmeal and grits.

6 comments:

Steffe said...

Thanks for the history lesson.

Jacob said...

Very interesting story! I think it would be worthwhile to visit this place...

bfarr said...

I'm glad they saved it.

Joan said...

It's hard to imagine all the beautiful structures that were burned down. I know that was the theory of the successful way to deal with your enemy but thank goodness some of them survived.

Paula said...

I like this photograph very much, you've shown us just enough to be curious. While I don't like what some of these old homes represent I do appreciate their beauty and the lessons they can teach us. I hope the Pilgrimage March is a great success.

Lois said...

It's magnificent!